top of page
Home: Blog2
Search
  • Writer's pictureThom Holmes

Electronic Keyboards in Jazz, A Recorded History, Part 2 of 2

My blog for the Bob Moog Foundation.


This podcast is the second of a two-part series in which we’re listening to examples of electronic keyboards in jazz. The first part covered the early history of electronic keyboards in jazz before the Fender Rhodes electric piano was launched in the late sixties. In this episode, we’ll begin around the time of the Fender Rhodes and explore various keyboards up until 1979 which is capped by the use of a wide variety of analog synthesizers.


What makes a keyboard suited to jazz? I would suggest that none of these instruments, with the exception of the Fender Rhodes, made their initial impact in the field of jazz. Most were created with rock and popular music in mind and were adopted by jazz musicians as they sought to electrify and amplify their music. In fact, I did a podcast about this way back in episode 14, Electronic Jazz, Part 2: Gadgets and Modifiers, where we explored how amplification, stomp boxes and signal modifiers normally associated with rock had been adapted by jazz artists for use with their horns, flutes, and other instruments. And before that, in Episode 13, in part 1 of that series on electronic jazz, we listened to examples from a parallel period during the 1960s when jazz artists experimented with electronic music on tape to broaden the textures of their sound.


Now, I turn to the role of electronic keyboards in jazz and how they provided the musician with a new dimension to their expressiveness.


One way to distinguish jazz from other genres of music is that every musician can be called upon to solo, especially in small ensembles. Something Miles Davis once said is worth quoting here. He said, “The thing to judge in any jazz artist is, does the man project and does he have ideas.” The creative expression allotted to each jazz musician, is, then the sacred territory that jazz music inhabits.


For many years, the acoustic piano was the sole keyboard used in most jazz. It was both a rhythm instrument and a solo instrument. It established the harmonic context for a piece and elaborated on it with its own voice. The dynamics of playing the piano are well known—differing pressures can be applied by the fingers to play loudly and softly; one can play long sustained notes using the pedals or sharply percussive notes with a fast touch; crescendos require the dexterity to begin playing softly and gradually increasing pressure and loudness to reach the peak. I would also add that the purposeful use of pauses and silence add to the exposition of piano playing. An improviser may use all of these techniques while forming their ideas around a given musical idea.


The electric organ, especially the Hammond B3, became the second most popular keyboard in jazz during the 1950s and introduced dynamics that were related to playing an electronic instrument. We listened to several players in part 1 of this series. The keys are on/off switches and to sustain a sound you press the keys continuously. The organ pedal has a different function than pedals on the piano. It is used to change the rotation speed of the loudspeaker, often a Leslie speaker system. To create a pitchbend effect, grace notes, rolls, and slurs can be played by quickly flicking the key one semitone to the left before hitting the intended note. The glissando, while playable on the piano as well, uses a different technique on the organ. One runs their hand up and down the keys using the side of the fingers or the back of the hand, being careful to merge it seamlessly with the playing that follows.


The Fender Rhodes, Wurlitzer Electric Piano, RMI Rock-Si-Chord, and Farfisa combo organ, all heard in this episode, could all be played using the traditional techniques of the piano and organ, so in that way these instruments already met the basic needs of the jazz player. It was easy for a jazz player just to plug them in and start playing. But each had additional controls over the timbre, voicings, and modification of the sounds that the jazz player could relate to in their playing. Each of these electronic instruments had a unique sound. Take for instance the chime-like, resonant tones of the Fender Rhodes and compare it to the sharp, fuzzy sound of the Wurlitzer electric piano or the short, guitar-like sound the Rock-Si-Chord and the softer, plucked sound of the Hohner Clavinet.  Electronic keyboards definitely offered a new assortment of sounds to the jazz musician. And we will also hear what happened when these gifted musicians got ahold of the analog synthesizer.


In this episode we’re going to listen to examples of all of these. The thirty tracks that follow are arranged in chronological order, except for the very first track, an informative demo of the Fender Rhodes by Herbie Hancock which was released as a promotional flexidisc from Fender Rhodes and included in a 1973 issue of Down Beat magazine. We’ll hear both sides of that. After setting the scene with that demo, we will hear eleven tracks featuring the Rhodes, Wurlitzer, Rock-Si-Chord, Farfisa, clavinet, and electric harpsichord from artists including Hancock, Joe Zawinul, Bill Evans, Sun Ra, Roger Kellaway, Alvin Ayers, Steve Allen, Don Ellis, and others. Then, we will enter the transition from piano and organ to synthesizer. First will be three Sun Ra tracks, all captured live, to showcase not only his early Minimoog experiments but also a trance-like performance on the Rock-Si-Chord. Following that will be three tracks from the synthesizer era of Herbie Hancock, all remarkable for his mastery of multiple keyboards but also showcasing his supporting players who were also part of his transformative sound. The third Hancock track is from Japan and is a solo exploration of various synthesizers. The final twelve tracks feature recordings of a variety of analog synthesizers from three continents. All to illustrate how the synthesizer contributed to a worldwide renewal of the jazz tradition. Among the recordings will be examples from Larry Young, already a noted Hammond B3 player, Jan Hammer, flutist Bobbi Humphrey and her ensemble featuring ARP and Minimoog synthesizers, Ramsey Lewis, noted as a piano player, the nice blending of Rhodes and Minimoog sounds from Argentinian player Fernando Gelbard, Clark Ferguson and “Jazz Flute” using the RMI Harmonic Synthesizer and Keyboard Computer, then Wolfgang Dauner, who brought his piano experience to the EMS Synthi 100, one of the largest off the shelf modular synths from the latter days of analog synthesis.


The start times for the tracks are provided below so that you can skip through the tracks more easily. My is always to assemble a blend of tunes that has meaning through the ways the individual tracks compare and contrast to the ones around them. But being able to isolate and find individual tracks is something I also appreciate.


I created a visual guide to most of the non-synthesizer makes and models of instruments included in this podcast, paying special attention to the expressive features that could be easily adopted by jazz musicians. You can download this illustrated chart, free of charge, by visiting the previous blog.


Episode 118

Electronic Keyboards in Jazz, A Recorded History, Part 2 of 2

 

Playlist

 

Track Time

Start Time

Opening and Introduction (Thom Holmes)

11:57

00:00

1.    Herbie Hancock, Herbie Hancock Demonstrates The Rhodes Piano (1973 Rhodes). A terrific flexi-disc produced by Rhodes and narrated by Hancock who tells an interesting story about his first encounter with the instrument on a Miles Davis session and then he walks the keyboard through a series of effects. He speaks with the authority of a proud electronics tinkerer who understands the nuances that make this instrument so beloved by jazz musicians. This flexi-disc was originally delivered in the November 8, 1973 issue of Down Beat magazine. I provide both sides of the disc, in entirety. Tunes included during the demonstration include parts of Watermelon Man, Maiden Voyage, and The Spook. Soloist, Rhodes Electric Piano, Voice, Herbie Hancock. I thought it would be wisest to lead off this podcast with an overview of the Rhodes even though it is out of chronological sequence, being from 1973. We then go back a few years to hear tracks in proper time order.

12:48

11:57

2.    The Don Ellis Orchestra, “Open Beauty” from Electric Bath (1967 Columbia). Alto Saxophone, Flute, Soprano Saxophone, Joe Roccisano, Ruben Leon; Baritone Saxophone, Flute, Bass Clarinet, John Magruder; Bass, Dave Parlato, Frank De La Rosa; Bass, Sitar, Ray Neapolitan; Congas, Bongos, Chino Valdes; Drums, Steve Bohannon; Leader, Trumpet, Don Ellis; Percussion, Alan Estes; Piano, Clavinet, Fender Electric Piano Fender, Mike Lang; Tenor Saxophone, Flute, Clarinet, Ron Starr; Tenor Saxophone, Flute, Piccolo Flute, Clarinet, Ira Schulman; Timbales, Vibraphone, Percussion , Mark Stevens; Trombone, Dave Sanchez, Ron Myers, Terry Woodson; Trumpet, Alan Weight, Bob Harmon, Ed Warren, Glenn Stuart.

5:33

24:44

3.    Miles Davis, “Stuff” from Miles In The Sky (1968 Columbia). I think this was Miles’ first album recorded using the Fender Rhodes, played by Herbie Hancock. See the opening tracks from this podcast for a story about this session from Hancock. Bass, Ron Carter; Drums, Tony Williams; Piano, Fender Electric Piano, Herbie Hancock; Tenor Saxophone, Wayne Shorter; Trumpet, Miles Davis.

16:59

30:14

4.    Joe Zawinul, “The Soul Of A Village (Part II)” from The Rise & Fall Of The Third Stream (1968 Vortex). Zawinul, along with Hancock, was an early adopter of the Fender Rhodes. Cello, Kermit Moore; Double Bass, Richard Davis; Drums, Freddie Waits, Roy McCurdy; Percussion, Warren Smith; Piano, Fender Electric Piano, Joe Zawinul; Tenor Saxophone, Arranged by, William Fischer; Trumpet, Jimmy Owens; Viola, Alfred Brown, Selwart Clarke, Theodore Israel.

4:16

47:10

5.    Oliver Nelson and Steve Allen, “Go Fly a Kite” from Soulful Brass (1968 Impulse). Another Steve Allen record, whom we heard from in part 1 playing the Wurlitzer Electric Piano. Here is a selection from an album on which he plays the Rock-Si-Chord and occasional piano. Arranged by Oliver Nelson; Rock-Si-Chord, piano, Steve Allen; Drums, Jimmy Gordon; session musicians, Barney Kessel, Bobby Bryant, Larry Bunker, Roger Kellaway, Tom Scott; Produced by Bob Thiele.

2:30

51:24

6.    J & K “Mojave” from Betwixt & Between (1969 A&M, CTI). “J” is J.J. Johnson (trombonist) and “K” is Kai Winding (trombonist). Their ensemble included Roger Kellaway playing the electric clavinette. An example of using the clavinet in jazz. This was most likely a Hohner Clavinet Model C which had just been introduced in 1968. Recorded at Van Gelder Studios during late 1968.

2:31

53:54

7.    Albert Ayler, “New Generation” from New Grass (1969 Impulse). An electric harpsichord played by Call Cobbs adds some subtle comping to this buoyant tune written by Ayler, Mary Parks, Rose Marie McCoy. Baritone Saxophone, Buddy Lucas; Design Cover And Liner, Byron Goto, Henry Epstein; Drums, Pretty Purdie; Electric Bass, Bill Folwell; Piano, Electric Harpsichord, Organ, Call Cobbs; Producer, Bob Thiele; Tenor Saxophone, Flute, Seldon Powell; Tenor Saxophone, Vocals, Albert Ayler; Trombone, Garnett Brown; Trumpet, Burt Collins, Joe Newman; Vocals, The Soul Singers.

5:06

56:22

8.    Bill Evans, “I’m All Smiles” from From Left To Right (1970 MGM). Piano, Rhodes Electric Piano, Bill Evans; Bass, John Beal; Conducted, arranged by Michael Leonard; Double Bass, Eddie Gomez; Drums,Marty Morell; Guitar, Sam Brown; Liner Notes, Harold Rhodes, Helen Keane, Michael Leonard; Produced by Helen Keane. For his 24th solo album, the long-established jazz pianist Evans took his turn playing both the Fender Rhodes and Steinway acoustic piano on this album, as two-handed duets no less. Liner notes were written by Harold Rhodes, inventor of the Rhodes Electric Piano.

5:42

1:01:24

9.    Sun Ra And His Intergalactic Research Arkestra, “Black Forest Myth” from It's After The End Of The World - Live At The Donaueschingen And Berlin Festivals (1971 MPS Records). You can hear Sun Ra enticing other-worldly sounds from a Farfisa organ beginning at about 1:35. Recorded in 1970. Of the many electronic keyboards heard elsewhere on this album (and occasionally on this track), here the Farfisa is heard the most. Farfisa organ, Hohner Electra, Hohner Clavinet, Piano, Performer, Rock-Si-Chord, Spacemaster, Minimoog, Voice, composed by, arranged by, Sun Ra; ; Alto Saxophone, Clarinet, Flute, Abshlom Ben Shlomo; Alto Saxophone, Flute, Clarinet, Danny Davis; Alto Saxophone, Flute, Oboe, Piccolo Flute, Drums, Marshall Allen; Baritone Saxophone, Alto Saxophone, Flute, Danny Thompson; Baritone Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Alto Saxophone, Clarinet, Bass Clarinet, Flute, Drums, Pat Patrick; Bass, Alejandro Blake Fearon; Bass Clarinet, Robert Cummings; Drums, Lex Humphries; Drums, Oboe, Flute, James Jackson; English Horn, Augustus Browning; Mellophone, Trumpet, Ahk Tal Ebah; Oboe, Bassoon, Bass Clarinet, Leroy Taylor; Percussion African, Other Fireeater, Dancer , Hazoume; Percussion Hand Drums, Nimrod Hunt; Percussion, Other Dancer, Ife Tayo, Math Samba; Photography By, Hans Harzheim; Producer, Liner Notes, Joachim E. Berendt; Tenor Saxophone, Percussion, John Gilmore; Trumpet, Kwame Hadi; Violin, Viola, Cello, Bass, Alan Silva; Voice, June Tyson.

9:07

1:07:05

10.Joe Scott And His Orchestra, “Raindrops Keep Fallin' On My Head” from Motion Pictures - The NOW Generation (1970 Mainstream). Listen for the Rock-Si-Chord in electric harpsichord mode. Bass, Charles Rainey; Cello, Charles McCracken, Gene Orloff, George Ricci, Maurice Bialkin;  Drums, Alvin Rogers, Joe Cass; Flute, Alto Flute, Bassoon, Tenor Flute, George Dessinger, Joe Soldo, Joseph Palmer, Philip Bodner; Flute, Flute Tenor, Alto Flute, Bassoon, Walt Levinsky; French Horn, Donald Corrado; Guitar, Jay Berliner, Stuart Scharf; Keyboards Rock-Si-Chord, Frank Owens; Mastered By Mastering, Dave Crawford (2); Percussion, Joseph Venuto; Piano, Frank Owens; Producer, Bob Shad; Trombone, Buddy Morrow, Tony Studd, Warren Covington, Wayne Andre; Trumpet, Bernie Glow, James Sedlar, John Bello, Mel Davis; Viola, Emanuel Vardi, Harold Coletta, John DiJanni, Theodore Israel; Violin, Aaron Rosand, Arnold Eidus, Emanuel Green, Frederick Buldrini, Harold Kohon, Harry Lookofsky, Joseph Malignaggi, Jules Brand, Leo Kahn, Lewis Eley, Mac Ceppos, Max Pollikoff, Paul Gershman, Peter Buonoconsiglio, Raymond Gniewek, Rocco Pesile, Winston Collymore.

2:28

1:16:12

11.The Phoenix Authority, “One” from Blood, Sweat & Brass (1970 Mainstream). Note the Rock-Si-Chord. Arranged by Ernie Wilkins; Bass, Charles Rainey; Drums, Grady Tate, Herbie Lovelle; Flute, Alto Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Chris Woods, Hubert Laws; Guitar, David Spinosa, Kenneth Burrell; Organ, Piano, Rock-Si-Chord, Frank Anderson, Frank Owen; Producer, Bob Shad; Trombone, Benny Powell, George Jeffers; Trumpet, Joseph Newman, Lloyd Michaels, Ray Copeland, Woody Shaw.

2:43

1:18:38

12.The Phoenix Authority, “Sugar, Sugar” from Blood, Sweat & Brass (1970 Mainstream). Listen for the Rock-Si-Chord. Arranged by Ernie Wilkins; Bass, Charles Rainey; Drums, Grady Tate, Herbie Lovelle; Flute, Alto Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Chris Woods, Hubert Laws; Guitar, David Spinosa, Kenneth Burrell; Organ, Piano, Rock-Si-Chord, Frank Anderson, Frank Owen; Producer, Bob Shad; Trombone, Benny Powell, George Jeffers; Trumpet, Joseph Newman, Lloyd Michaels, Ray Copeland, Woody Shaw.

3:34

1:21:20

Sun Ra’s flare for electronic sound in performance is demonstrated in the following three tracks that make excellent use of the several keyboards, the Farfisa organ, Minimoog, and Rock-Si-Chord.

13.Sun Ra And His Astro-Intergalactic-Infinity-Arkestra,’ “Discipline No. 11” from Nidhamu (Live In Egypt Vol. II) (1974 El Saturn Records). Recorded at Ballon Theater, Cairo, Egypt December 17, 1971. Sun Ra playing several electronic keyboards in turn, the organ, Minimoog, and Rock-si-Chord. What I hear is some organ (Farfisa?) in the opening, then Sun Ra turns to a wild exchange between the Minimoog (monophonic) and Rock-Si-chord (polyphonic) during the second half of the track. Alto Saxophone, Congas, Larry Northington; Alto Saxophone, Flute, Danny Davis, Hakim Rahim; Alto Saxophone, Flute, Oboe, Marshall Allen; Baritone Saxophone, Pat Patrick; Baritone Saxophone, Flute, Danny Thompson; Bass Clarinet, Elo Omoe; Composed By, Arranged By, Piano, Organ, Minimoog, Rock-Si-Chord, Sun Ra; Engineer Recording Engineer, Tam Fiofori; Percussion, Lex Humphries, Tommy Hunter; Photography By, Sam Bankhead; Photography Liner Photo, Mike Evans; Producer, Infinity Inc. And The East; Tenor Saxophone, Percussion, John Gilmore; Trumpet, Congas, Kwame Hadi; Vocals, June Tyson.

9:31

1:24:52

14.Sun Ra And His Astro-Intergalactic-Infinity-Arkestra,’ “Cosmo-Darkness” from Live In Egypt Vol. I (Nature's God) (Dark Myth Equation Visitation) (1972 Thoth Intergalactic). Beginning around 0:26, you get an example of Sun Ra’s rhythmic, trace-like playing of the Rock-Si-Chord. Alto Saxophone, Congas, Larry Northington; Alto Saxophone, Flute, Danny Davis, Hakim Rahim; Alto Saxophone, Flute, Oboe, Marshall Allen; Baritone Saxophone, Pat Patrick; Baritone Saxophone, Flute, Danny Thompson; Bass Clarinet, Elo Omoe; Composed By, Arranged by, Piano, Organ, Minimoog, Rock-Si-Chord, Sun Ra; Engineer Recording Engineer, Tam Fiofori; Percussion, Lex Humphries, Tommy Hunter; Photography By, Sam Bankhead; Photography Liner Photo, Mike Evans; Producer, Infinity Inc. And The East; Tenor Saxophone, Percussion, John Gilmore; Trumpet, Congas, Kwame Hadi; Vocals, June Tyson.

2:05

1:34:25

15.Sun Ra And His Astro-Intergalactic-Infinity-Arkestra,’ “Solar Ship Voyage” from Live In Egypt Vol. I (Nature's God) (Dark Myth Equation Visitation) (1972 Thoth Intergalactic). This track features Sun Ra and the Minimoog in an extended solo. Alto Saxophone, Congas, Larry Northington; Alto Saxophone, Flute, Danny Davis, Hakim Rahim; Alto Saxophone, Flute, Oboe, Marshall Allen; Baritone Saxophone, Pat Patrick; Baritone Saxophone, Flute, Danny Thompson; Bass Clarinet, Elo Omoe; Composed By, Arranged by, Piano, Organ, Minimoog, Rock-Si-Chord, Sun Ra; Engineer Recording Engineer, Tam Fiofori; Percussion, Lex Humphries, Tommy Hunter; Photography By, Sam Bankhead; Photography Liner Photo, Mike Evans; Producer, Infinity Inc. And The East; Tenor Saxophone, Percussion, John Gilmore; Trumpet, Congas, Kwame Hadi; Vocals, June Tyson.

2:40

1:36:30

Herbie Hancock mastered an array of keyboards, including the Fender Rhodes and several ARP models in the next three tracks tracing only two years in his musical journey.

16.Herbie Hancock, “Rain Dance” from Sextant (1973 Columbia). Patrick Gleason provides beats and beeps using the ARP 2600 and ARP Soloist. Bass Trombone, Tenor Trombone, Trombone Alto Trombone, Cowbell, Pepo (Julian Priester); Congas, Bongos, Buck Clarke; Drums, Jabali (Billy Hart); Effects Random Resonator, Fundi Electric Bass Fender Electric Bass With Wah-Wah And Fuzz, Double Bass, Mchezaji (Buster Williams); Electric Piano Fender Rhodes, Clavinet Hohner D-6 With Fender Fuzz-Wah And Echoplex, Percussion Dakka-Di-Bello, Mellotron, Piano Steinway, Handclaps, Songs by Mwandishi (Herbie Hancock); Synthesizer, Mellotron, John Vieira; Soprano Saxophone, Bass Clarinet, Piccolo Flute, Afoxé Afuche, Kazoo Hum-A-Zoo, Mwile (Benny Maupin); ARP 2600, ARP Soloist, Dr. Patrick Gleeson; Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Mganga (Dr. Eddie Henderson).

9:19

1:39:08

17.  Herbie Hancock, “Palm Grease” from Thrust (1974 Columbia). Hancock himself plays all the keyboards and synthesizers on this album. Drums, Mike Clark; Electric Bass, Paul Jackson; Electric Piano Fender Rhodes, Clavinet Hohner D-6, Synthesizer Arp Odyssey, Arp Soloist, Arp 2600, Arp String, written by Herbie Hancock; Percussion, Bill Summers; Producers, David Rubinson, Herbie Hancock; Soprano Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Bass Clarinet, Alto Flute, Bennie Maupin.

10:36

1:48:18

18.Herbie Hancock, “Nobu” = ノブ from Dedication = デディケーショ(1974 CBS/Sony). Fascinating recording because it is Hancock solo with an assortment of keyboards, including the Fender Rhodes and multiple ARP models. Piano, Fender Rhodes, Arp Pro Soloist, Arp Odyssey, Arp 3604, Arp 2600, Arp PE-IV String Ensemble, composed by Herbie Hancock; Engineer, Tomoo Suzuki; Producer, David Rubinson.

7:33

1:58:46

The analog synthesizer became a regular companion of the Fender Rhodes in jazz, leading up to the end of the 1970s.

19.Bobbi Humphrey, “My Little Girl” from Satin Doll (1974 Blue Note). The great jazz funk flutist Bobbi Humphrey released a series of albums around this time that often-featured fantastic synthesizer players. Here you can pick out the Minimoog by Don Preston and the ARP (Odyssey?) by Larry Mizell. The synths included here are in contrast to the more experimental sounds that Herbie Hancock was issuing at the same time. Flute, Vocals, Bobbi Humphrey; ARP Synthesizer, Larry Mizell; Minimoog, Don Preston; Bass, Chuck Rainey; Congas, King Errison; Drums, Harvey Mason; Electric Piano Fender Rhodes, Fonce Mizell, Larry Mizell; Guitar, John Rowin, Melvin "Wah Wah" Ragin; Percussion, Roger Sainte, Stephany Spruill; Piano, Jerry Peters; Produced by Chuck Davis, Larry Mizell; Trumpet, Fonce Mizell.

6:39

2:06:19

20.Ramsey Lewis, “Jungle Strut” from Sun Goddess (1974 Columbia). Another mainstream jazz artist who found many interesting sounds to accompany his electric piano. ARP, ARP Ensemble, Piano, Fender Rhodes, Wurlitzer electric piano, Ramsey Lewis; Congas, Drums, Derf Rehlew Raheem, Maurice Jennings; Electric Upright Bass Fender, Cleveland Eaton; Guitar, Byron Gregory; Synthesizer Freeman String, Ramsey Lewis; Tambura, Percussion, Maurice Jennings; Vocals, Derf Rehlew Raheem; Written by, R. Lewis.

4:40

2:12:54

21.  Ramsey Lewis, “Tambura” from Sun Goddess (1974 Columbia). ARP, ARP Ensemble, Piano, Fender Rhodes, Wurlitzer electric piano, Ramsey Lewis; Drums, Tambura, Congas, Percussion, Maurice Jennings; Electric Upright Bass Fender, Cleveland Eaton; Guitar, Byron Gregory; Written by R. Lewis.

2:52

2:17:32

22.Clark Ferguson, “Jazz Flute” from RMI Harmonic Synthesizer And Keyboard Computer (1974 Rocky Mount Instruments, Inc.). Not an instrument often used in jazz, so I turn to the company’s demonstration album for a sample of this more advanced in the RMI keyboard family. RMI Harmonic Synthesizer, Clark Ferguson.

2:43

2:20:24

23.  Fernando Gelbard, “Sombrero De Flores” from Didi (1974 Discos Redonde). A straight-up jazz track from Argentine musicial Gelbard that features both the Fender Rhodes and the Minimoog. Fender Rhodes, Minimoog, Fernando Gelbard; Bass, Ricardo Salas; Congas, Vocals, Ruben Rada; Drums, Norberto Minichillo; Fender Rhodes, Minimoog, Fernando Gelbard; Percussion, Effects, Miguel "Chino" Rossi; Producer, Alberto M. Tsalpakian, Juan Carlos Maquieira; Tenor Saxophone, Horacio "Chivo" Borraro.

7:25

2:23:04

24.  Fernando Gelbard, “Mojo Uno” from Didi (1974 Discos Redonde). This track features an outrageously unique Minimoog part that is akin to something you would hear from Sun Ra. Fender Rhodes, Minimoog, Fernando Gelbard; Bass, Ricardo Salas; Congas, Vocals, Ruben Rada; Drums, Norberto Minichillo; Fender Rhodes, Minimoog, Fernando Gelbard; Percussion, Effects, Miguel "Chino" Rossi; Producer, Alberto M. Tsalpakian, Juan Carlos Maquieira; Tenor Saxophone, Horacio "Chivo" Borraro.

2:00

2:30:28

25.Jan Hammer “Darkness / Earth In Search Of A Sun” from The First Seven Days (1975 Atlantic). On this track you get to hear (I think) three different synthesizers all fit for Hammer’s purpose, the solo Moog, Oberheim fills, and Freeman strings. Producer, Engineer, Piano, Electric Piano, Moog, Oberheim, and the Freeman string synthesizer; digital sequencer, Drums, Percussion, Composed by, Jan Hammer.

4:29

2:32:26

26.Larry Young's Fuel, “Moonwalk” from Spaceball (1976 Arista). CDX-0652 Portable Moog Organ, Minimoog , FRM-S810 Freeman String Symphonizer, Organ Hammond B-3, Fender Rhodes, Piano, Larry Young Jr.; Bass Rickenbacker, Dave Eubanks; Hohner Clavinet , Piano, Minimoog, Julius Brockington; Drums Ludwig Drums, Zildgian Cymbals, Percussion, Jim Allington; Guest Special Guest Star, Larry Coryell; Guitar, Danny Toan, Ray Gomez; Percussion, Abdoul Hakim, Barrett Young, Clifford Brown, Farouk; Producer, Terry Philips; Tenor Saxophone Selmer, Soprano Saxophone Selmer, Flute Armstrong, Vocals, Al Lockett; Vocals, Paula West.

5:32

2:36:52

27.Larry Young's Fuel, “Startripper” from Spaceball (1976 Arista). CDX-0652 Portable Moog Organ, Minimoog , FRM-S810 Freeman String Symphonizer, Organ Hammond B-3, Fender Rhodes, Piano, Larry Young Jr.; Bass Rickenbacker, Dave Eubanks; Hohner Clavinet , Piano, Minimoog, Julius Brockington; Drums Ludwig Drums, Zildgian Cymbals, Percussion, Jim Allington; Guest Special Guest Star, Larry Coryell; Guitar, Danny Toan, Ray Gomez; Percussion, Abdoul Hakim, Barrett Young, Clifford Brown, Farouk; Producer, Terry Philips; Tenor Saxophone Selmer, Soprano Saxophone Selmer, Flute Armstrong, Vocals, Al Lockett; Vocals, Paula West.

4:44

2:42:22

28.Wolfgang Dauner, “Stück Für Piano Und Synthesizer Op. 1” from Changes (1978 Mood Records). Dauner is one of the only jazz players to utilize the massive EMS Synthi 100. Written, produced, recorded, Steinway C-Flügel piano, EMS Synthi 100, Oberheim 4 Voice Polyphonic Synthesizer, Wolfgang Dauner.

9:51

2:47:04

29.Wolfgang Dauner, “War Was, Carl?” from Grandison - Musik Für Einen Film (1979 Zweitausendeins). More analog synthesizer jazz from Germany. C-flute, Alt-flute, Baß-flute, Manfred Hoffbauer; Oboe, English Horn, Hanspeter Weber; Percussion, Drums,  Jörg Gebhard; Piano, Synthesizer, Percussion, Conductor, Wolfgang Dauner.

1:12

2:56:54

30.Wolfgang Dauner, “Intellektuelles Skalpell” from Grandison - Musik Für Einen Film (1979 Zweitausendeins). C-flute, Alt-flute, Baß-flute, Manfred Hoffbauer; Oboe, English Horn, Hanspeter Weber; Percussion, Drums,  Jörg Gebhard; Piano, Synthesizer, Percussion, Conductor, Wolfgang Dauner.

1:26

2:58:06

 

Opening background music: 1) Sun Ra And His Astro-Intergalactic-Infinity-Arkestra,’ “The Light Thereof” from Live In Egypt Vol. I (Nature's God) (Dark Myth Equation Visitation) (1972 Thoth Intergalactic) (5:14). Farfisa organ playing from Sun Ra. 2) Oliver Nelson and Steve Allen, “Green Tambourine” from Soulful Brass (1968 Impulse) (2:28). Steve Allen plays the Rock-Si-Chord. 3) Oliver Nelson and Steve Allen, “Torino” from Soulful Brass (1968 Impulse) (2:02). Steve Allen plays the Rock-Si-Chord.

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

See my companion blog that I write for the Bob Moog Foundation.

163 views0 comments

Comments


IMG_0519.jpg

NOISE AND NOTATIONS

Electronic and Experimental Music

Notes on the development and continuing history of electronic music, its creators, and the technology.

Home: Welcome
Home: Subscribe
Home: Contact
bottom of page